like an oleander, bright white leaves

17 / nonbinary / girls? i heard of 'em / pacific coaster. my name is vincent and this is my art & project blog. thank you for dropping by, especially if you help to support my works by reblogging! i would like to ask that you don't repost my works to other websites without my permission or a link back to here.

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Posts tagged Anonymous:

An Anonymous user asked:

I don't personally follow any minors but I see your art on my dash sometimes and you do a really great job! Love your hornbill art

oh thank you !! yeah im still really proud of all of the hornbills; i think i might draw some more sometime because they really are a joy to draw


An Anonymous user asked:

Is this a SFW blog?

Yes! I do not post NSFW content online, to this or any other social media, as I am a minor. I'm pretty sure that would also be a terms of service violation as far as this site is concerned.


An Anonymous user asked:

๐Ÿ€

๐Ÿ€Whatโ€™s considered good luck?

This one varies heavily between cultures and subcultures, but I'll generalize this a bit.

A good-luck tradition of nomadic groups, popularized by members of the valamin diaspora, is to bring a shiny or smooth stone with you and switch it out every time you camp for the night. The good luck of a smooth stone, however, is often considered to be cancelled out if you either forget to find a new stone, or if the stone you've been carrying cracks in travel. Details vary frequently depending on who you ask.

Among the lush eastern forests where roaming hunter-gatherer societies thrive, it is often considered a good omen for the season to see birds passing through the area. It is thought to signal a higher concentration of food and resources, but in most societies, killing the birds is either a rejection of the seasonal boon, or marks the beginning of a blight on the region.

In migratory subspecies of skadoun, it is thought to be a favorable sign to settle momentarily where dolphins and other sorts of cetaceans are congregating. These breaks are few, and far between, but are typically necessary to feed. Conversely, it is an ill omen to see a red dawn mid-migration, as typically a red dawn is a harbinger of storms to come.

Sedentary populations of valamin in the far north often consider the sentimental value of an object roughly equivalent to its luck, and keeping such items in dangerous places is simultaneously considered unlucky and frowned upon. This is all because of the weight and value that isolated, far-north valamin put on sentiment and personal bonds.


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